Gersh Reaches Agreement With WGA
11:22 AM PST 1/17/2020
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"Writers are vital to our industry, and Gersh has a long and proud history representing them," co-presidents David Gersh and Bob Gersh said in a statement.

Gersh has reached an agreement with the Writers Guild of America, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

The agency is the largest full-service firm to date — its clients include Adam Driver and Patricia Arquette — to come to terms with the union, joining a growing list of agencies that includes Verve, Kaplan Stahler, Culture Creative Entertainment, Buchwald, Abrams and Rothman Brecher. With the pact, Gersh will resume representing WGA members, effective immediately.

"Writers are vital to our industry, and Gersh has a long and proud history representing them," co-presidents David Gersh and Bob Gersh said in a statement. "We are deeply committed to our writers and their interests, and appreciate their patience. We enthusiastically look forward to resuming our work on their behalf."

After the 42-year-old franchise agreement between the WGA and the Association of Talent Agents expired last April, the two entities could not come to terms over a new deal and the WGA instructed its members to leave their agencies, causing a mass exodus of more than 7,000 scribes industry-wide overnight. To date, the ATA has balked at the WGA's new code of conduct, which compels signatories to refrain from taking any compensation beyond commission (which would prohibit the charging of packaging fees) as well as having corporate affiliations with any production entities. These two conditions, especially the latter, primarily affect only the three biggest agencies — WME (from which Endeavor Content sprang), CAA (which has affiliated production arm Wiip) and UTA (which has set up Civic Center Media as a joint TV content venture with THR parent company Valence Media).

As such, while those three agencies and the ATA are locked in suits and countersuits with the WGA, the guild has been negotiating directly with agencies individually — a process that so far is proving productive.

In a letter to the agency's literary clients, Bob and David Gersh wrote: "Thank you for your patience. Gersh has represented writers for over 70 years, helping to build and nurture some of the industry's top literary talent. We are deeply committed to you and your interests and are eager to resume our work on your behalf."